Friday, March 19, 2010

Why I hate "Pitucos"


A couple days ago I got a comment on one of my articles from somebody who asked me what Pitucos are and why I hated them so much. In truth, this is an article that I've been wanting to write for some time. Indeed, this is one of the MAJOR topics that needs to be written about in regards to Peru. However, I've been hesitant to write it since I start getting all worked up and pissed off (but it looks like I'm in for it now so here goes).

I remember reading an article in "An American in Lima" that defined Pitucos as "snobs." Well, that's an accurate but very incomplete definition. How incomplete? Well, the article was about how the Pitucos had passed a law which prevented their maids from swimming on the same beach as they (the Pitucos) did. THAT'S the kind of people we're talking about here.

Now, before I go any further let me just say that 99% of the people you meet in Peru are going to be the kindest, most noble, most generous people you're ever going to meet in your life (and I suppose it's because of this that I've hesitated to write about Pitucos in the past). Peruvians work HARD (much harder than I've ever seen ANYBODY work in America), but they're mainly poor. Why are they mainly poor? Well, the Pitucos are too busy SPENDING the money and NOT working that it never trickles down to the poorer people of Peru.

You see, the Pitucos represent the wealthiest 1% or so of the population. And although you'd think you wouldn't see too many of them (being as they're only 1%), there are about 10 times as many "wanna-be" Pitucos who pretend to have money and competence and all that stuff and who walk around all day with their nose in the air.

You know, I remember a joke my Uncle once told me about a minor noble woman in England from a couple centuries ago. Upon having sex for the first time she reportedly stated, "wow, that's FAR too good for the commoners." To me, that sentiment encapsulates the privileged Pituco attitude. It's the same thing as saying that some people aren't allowed on the beach because the beach is good enough for the Pitucos and thus is too good for everyone else.

I mean how fucking ridiculous is it to SAY or even THINK that a group of people shouldn't have SEX because it's too GOOD for them? I mean, Pitucos would DENY THEMSELVES A WORKFORCE (after all, sex is where children come from) just to spite poor people who they think they are superior to. And the thing is, most of these Pitucos haven't DONE anything! They're just the spoiled brat children of rich people who achieved their money probably through swindling somebody, slavery, the drug trade, or some other unscrupulous tactic. Sure, there are a few honorable wealthy people in Peru, just like there are honorable wealthy people in all parts of the world. Actually, the Pituconess isn't so much attributable to WEALTH, but the attitude of superiority and racism that many of these people cultivate.

Seriously, if you're walking down the street in Peru and you get in the way of a Pituco who is driving his car you better dive out of the way because he/she will have no qualms whatsoever about running you over. The fact that you're not in a car will prove to this person that you are of inferior fiber. I've actually SEEN fancy cars hit people only to have the driver jump out of the car and BERATE the person they just struck! However, if the Pituco sees you and recognizes you as a potentially wealthy person, they will be overtly polite, but don't be fooled, the second your back is turned you're going to be the gossip of truly repugnant, ridiculous, character bashing gossip beyond anything you can imagine.

Seriously, Pitucos are pieces of shit.

There are many Pituco clubs around Lima that simply don't let indigenous looking people enter no matter how much money they have. They always claim it's because there is a problem with the person's shoes or clothing or whatever, but it's plain racism (Larco Mar is full of racist clubs like this).

As a white person traveling to Peru, you'll probably never notice this nasty behavior because by virtue of the fact that you are white, you are generally granted all Pituco privileges. However, if you start dating a woman who the Pitucos don't accept as their own (or who they view to be beneath them) WATCH OUT and be prepared to be socially shunned.

You know, the funny thing is that there is absolutely nothing to justify this superior attitude. Pitucos aren't any better looking than anyone else, they don't have more money (most of them are mortgaged to the hilt as a matter of fact) and they aren't more polite or pleasant to be around. Most of them have had maids since they were 2 years old, so they're incapable of washing dishes or clothing and they can't even feed themselves. But they strut around with a judgmental attitude, are extremely discourteous, and they're even dangerous in their indifference to the feelings and needs of other people (hitting people with their cars is only ONE way that this plays out).

In a country like Peru where so many people live in abject poverty, the existence of this wealthy indulgent class is truly despicable. It is, essentially, a case of slave labor, and the treatment that many of the servants receive is simply sub-human.

Let me just say again, however, that the Pitucos are easily avoided during your trip to Peru. Just don't stay at $100 a night or more hotel rooms. Don't go to places where people are actually doing any work. Avoid clubs that charge a S/. 100 entry fee, and you'll be among the 99% of the Peruvian population which works hard, treats people with terrific manners, and feels no sense of entitlement or superiority. People like THAT are what make up the TRUE essence of Peru. The Pitucos are just pieces of shit from a bygone age that haven't yet been flushed...but their time is coming.


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126 comments:

  1. Umm dude seriously I live in Peru and am a "pituco" or whatever. Firstly, at least my friends and I aren't assholes to people. Yes, we do have a maid but so? So do a lot of poor people who's maids are poorer than they are. You think 99% of Peru is poor and hardworking? Wow... no offense but you are the one who lacks knowledge in this case. If you mean Pituco to be rich, snobby and white, then yes we are there. But don't talk crap saying that we can't do anything on out own just for having money. And also, it is more than 1%. At least 10% is rich, and more than that is white. (20%). Peru is not only Lima, there are many other locations. You can't just put made up statistics with no proof. I doubt you've been to all of Peru.

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    1. Yes you are a pituco. Only stupid mother fuckers accept to be pitucos

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    2. If you are a snob, you're probably an asshole. High correlation there.

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    3. You nailed it bruh

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    4. 10% rich??? Impossible, more like 6%-7%, which would include rich and upper middle class. I can guarantee you if there was a large, permanent US (civilian/military) presence in Peru, mainly Lima, these Pitucos would simply fade away, step aside, otherwise it`d be pure suicide for them.

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  2. and they totally lack of self-irony or self-criticism or whatever... that's the thing that annoyed me the most over there. they just think that it has always been like that and will ever be...I mean, maybe it's not their (generation's) fault that there is virtually no middle class in countries like Peru, but they could at least feel bad for it or like wanting to change it or something instead of driving with their camionetas to Asia...drunk as shit and not caring for anyone except themselves...man, now you got me going...;-)

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  3. I'm not sure what article Anonymous read but I certainly didn't define Pitucos as being "rich, snobby and white." I also said there are plenty of wealthy people in Peru who aren't Pitucos.

    But I'm pretty sure that Anonymous IS a Pituco since he's obviously completely indifferent to getting the facts straight.

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  4. Hey anonymous, go pop your collar and participate in what ever trends pitucos don't understand are already old and flaming. I'll hand it to you that Ben throws out unfounded stats/gross generalizations (you're guilty as well (eg. %10 is rich)) and I understand/empathize wanting to feel special (I'm sure I went to a better school than you). However, you missed the point that being pituco isn't about having a maid (man I miss ironed socks)or money; it's about having a baseless sense of superiority.
    Rex Chatterman

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    1. If you think the average american school for the average joe is better than a "private" school for pitucos you've got some issues bro. Anyway most pitucos don't even study at Peru, they study at boarding schools in New England and Switzerland. Quite a cliche isn't it? Well get over it and man up.

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    2. Sweetie, as a high school teacher at a bilingual, international school in Lima, YES, the average American school IS better than your overpriced private schools in Lima. I started working at private schools here so that my child could have a discount for his education and guaranteed admission. But after several years experience at a few of the top schools in the city (country), I realize that nothing compares to the public education that I received in the US. I knew a Peruvian doctor - a researcher in a specialized field - who was studying basic concepts in his Master's course at PUCP that I learned in high school. I'm not even kidding. (And he was not too fond of getting my help, being twice my age and technically higher up the academic ladder.) Lima's education is all fluff and nothing of substance. Just like the pitucos. (Hint: the white, western foreigners that you guys are trying so desperately to imitate, actually really hate you because you are useless, worthless, racist and elitist human beings. I'm proud of the fact that I can do my own laundry without using a modern day slave. I enjoy paying my own rent in my 20s without mooching off mommy and daddy. And I will key every one of your cars that tries to run me over, as I have done. And I will insult any pituco that shows bad manners - like pushing their way through the grocery store, or not giving a reserved seat to someone who needs it on the bus, or any other show of their bad upbringing. I don't care if you have money. You doing those things is exactly the same as a poor person doing those things, who you are all too ready to look down on and criticize for having bad manners and no "educacion". Look in the mirror. You guys would be surprised at the ugliness of your own characters, if you ever had any experience outside of Peru.)

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    3. If I had to put a label to myself I would say that I'm somehow pituco. I grew up in a family where my dad had a very prosperous position in the oil and gas field. My mom is white but my dad is mestizo, I myself look mestizo with white features, something that I couldn't care less. We do have a maid, but it is more for convenience as my parents even after 30 years, work from 7 to 6 everyday and in Peru the cost of having a maid is cheap. Not to mention that our maid gets an education allowance and she has the right to eat with us, even on holidays. So don't even compare her as to a modern-day slave because it's not the case. We are actually helping her out of poverty.

      I'm sick and tired of all the foreigners coming to Peru to criticize our country and compare them to theirs to make us feel inferior. Indeed, we are A POOR country and we know it, but we are not a subsaharan-poor country…I don't believe that the peruvian doctor didn't know concepts that you learned in High School and that story is obviously made up. Good try though, I hope it makes you feel better as an American(or whatever your background is)!

      I studied civil engineering at the university of Calgary in Canada, and the main difference in the education I had abroad was mostly the amount of resources the institution had available for us and the experience and curriculum of the professors at the University. I compared what I studied to what my friends here in Peru studied and it was 100% the same. However, labs were completely different. We had a seismic shaker, a handful of materials to test, new technology, etc…But theoretically it was all the same. I studied in a private school in Lima, and I even got a few credits for calculus, bio and physic courses that I was supposed to take at my first year abroad, courses that first year students didn't take before university(or taken as AP).

      As for the "keying your car" comment: that just demonstrates your lack of education and respect to other's property. Insulting pitucos that show bad manners…Well let me tell you that you would be surprised of at the ugliness of your won character!

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  5. Well, the article was about how the Pitucos had passed a law which prevented their maids from swimming on the same beach as they (the Pitucos) did. What?!?!?!?!?!? Talking about getting the facts wrong. Peru isnt that behind in civil rights
    I was invited to one of those beaches once and i had the chance to ask about this issue. They (my friends) told me that the maids werent allowed to swim while they were working, if they wanted they could swim on their free time. (they had none because they were there working)

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  6. The articule is not accurate. The pitucos don't have maids since thay are 2 years old. They do since they are born!

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    1. And they don't have only one or two... more than 6 I think.

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  7. Anonymous from 10:20 is a true idiot now isn't he? First he quotes me about saying how the "law prevented maids from swimming" then he goes on to say I don't have the facts right, then he goes on to say that the law only prevented them from swimming during the day!

    THUS, they are PREVENTED from swimming and my facts are RIGHT!

    But, as always, these pitucos eventually damn themselves with a throw-away line. In this case, the guy ends with "they could swim on their free time. (they had none because they were there working)"

    So you're trying to justify this law by saying that these people need to WORK 24 hrs a day 7 days a week?

    Yeah, you're awesome...

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  8. Your facts are wrong beacause there is not such law, there is a law thats says that only members (owners) are allowed inside a club (all the houses belong to different clubs)if the owners want to allow guests in the club they have to pay for them. This is the good part, owners dont have to pay for the maids because they are not guests, they are supposed to be there working (the owner could pay for the maids entrance as another guests) they are "working 24/7 beacause thats the only reason they are allowed in the club, if they stop working then you have a non-member, non guest inside the club.Can you see where this is going?

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  9. These continuing desperate efforts to defend this racist law are disturbing. First of all, these laws are impractical (a maid/nanny is prohibited from swimming...so if a pituco baby runs into the ocean and starts to drown, the maid should just sit there and watch her die).

    The fact that the pitucos can't afford to just buy a membership for their maids is hilarious. Obviously they aren't that wealthy if they can't even afford to pay for the daily entry for their maid.

    Engaged within your argument is a belief that the maids are sub-human (this is the problem). You believe maids shouldn't have to pay an entry fee because they're there to work 24/7. Making somebody work 24/7 is WRONG!

    Why don't you just ask the club to have a baby-sitting area and give the maids the weekend off when you go to asia? Oh yeah, it's because a pituco is so frickin' incompetent that he/she can't even spend two days alone at a resort without having somebody there (who he/she thinks is inferior) to wipe his/her ass.

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    1. Oh lord this is retard level 100. I was willing to go along with you even after you titled your article in the spirit of hate. Even after you said "I mean how fucking ridiculous is it to SAY or even THINK that a group of people shouldn't have SEX because it's too GOOD for them?" I was willing to go along with you for your interesting account but this comment shows you are out somewhere by Hubble and the "pieces of shit" as you called them are closer in orbit to planet Earth.

      It's getting embarrassing when you attribute to the law the guideline that "the maid should just sit there and watch [the drowning child] die." No one has said this. No one ever has ever said any of this ever. Ever.

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    2. I just wrote a long response but it didn't get posted. I'm new; maybe it just takes time to show up?

      The gist of what I typed was that, what you said ("the maid should just sit there and watch her die") was never stipulated or implied by that law. C'mon, be reasonable, G.

      Also, working 24/7 probably wasn't what he meant literally. They may not even be On Call 24/7. From the context he probably meant "working 100% of the time they are at work." Just imagine he didn't say 24/7 and you have basically a solid argument from Anon about a non-member relaxing at a pay-to-enter club.

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    3. Logan, the quote that you referenced (about sex being too good for the poor) is attributed to a European Monarch, I included it as an example of the absurd and backwards thinking of the extremely wealthy who sometimes believe they can and should control the world. I believe this correlates with the typical Pituco mentality.

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  10. "The fact that the pitucos can't afford to just buy a membership for their maids is hilarious. " "Why don't you just ask the club to have a baby-sitting area and give the maids the weekend off when you go to asia?"
    If they want a weekend of they can stay in lima. If they want to go to a club then they should pay for it just like the rest of us, they are already recieving free meals and housing (they eat the same thing their employers eat and live in the same house).Why should they give them anything else?

    As an anecdote i remember when my friends asked their driver (they get the same treatment as maids) if he wanted to work that weekend (at the beach house). When i asked him why he was so excited about it he told me: "Im going to spend the weekend watching tv at a beach house and the only thing i have to do is the same thing i do everyday."
    Sometimes you have to ask yourself if there is more to a story than what you read in the newspaper or blogs

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    1. Are you serious? Read about dynamics of oppression, please.

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  11. Yeah, it's just like a weekend at the beach house...until he tries to go for a swim at least...

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  12. Wha's funny is that with each comment, Mr. Anonymous keeps proving the article's point.

    I think it IS important to recognize that not all upper class Peruvians are piticuos. A lot of my Peruvian friends can't see that either. It's complicated.

    You Mr. Peru are fun to read, even if sometimes your sweeping generalizations and sometimes scaryily close to fratboy humor make me cringe a bit. You write things I think about, honestly. That's such a breath of fresh air (metaphorically speaking, of course, since there is no fresh air in Lima).

    Just one complaint which I keep repeating if only because it makes me feel better - PLEASE Enable full RSS feeds. I read Blogs through Readers or on my mobile phone, and it's so much easier that way.

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  13. Hey Mitch,
    It's funny/sad because the guy thinks he's being reasonable. I feel like I'm watching "Borat."

    Thanks for the compliments and thank god you don't agree with me on everything because I'm often completely in the wrong. Sometimes I know it (and I'm just trying to provoke people) sometimes I don't (because of the flaws in my character) but I never shy away from controversy (because that way I can claim I was doing it on purpose while I secretly work on myself)!

    Do you get pictures on full RSS feeds? What I've heard is that full RSS feeds cause a drop in hits because people just read the article on their web page (and I need good google analytics numbers to get sponsors...I do have a few).

    I tell you what, if you pay me $100 a month to put a "Soy Andina" advertisement on my page, I will enable RSS feeds (seriously, that's perfectly reasonable now isn't it)!

    :)

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  14. great article ben, as always. miss having you around here!!

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  15. So my dog's nana came down with the Gripe (probably because she walked barefoot on my kitchen floor and then drank a cold beverage near an open window while not wearing proper neck protection), but anyway, I had no nana for my dog yesterday. I actually had to take my own dog for a walk. What made matters worse is that some jackass politician in Miraflores made some law that I can't just let my dog drop his turd and be on my merry way. They actually expect me to bring a plastic bag with me and scoop the poop!? Since I'm a rich white person I told that Sera-nazgul where he could stick his plastic bag and went on my merry way. Thank God my nana got over her gripe and I don't have to walk that damn dog anymore.

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  16. Okay, I'm the first guy who commented on this post ( I'm stating this because there were other anonymous users). I wanted to say that I read your article again and I misread somethings. I am not a pituco but I am wealthy and white, which I thought you were insulting. I care a lot for poor people actually, and Ive started funds for them. Also, one user said that he probably went to a better school then me. I don't know, I went to Roosevelt in La Molina, and now I'm going to Harvard in Boston. So maybe not.

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  17. Congratulations for "starting funds" for poor people...you're obviously awesome.

    I've never heard of the two schools you mention, they obviously don't teach reading comprehension very well though (based on your comments).

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    1. He clearly isn't from Roosevelt, let alone Harvard haha. He's just a cholo wannabe

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    2. Obviously, just look at his grammar.

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  18. Doosh bag anonymous guy
    At Harvard make sure to take an English class and more imprtantly some Ethics classes..however, like most wanna be pitucos you just probably named the best school you could think of...thanks for the deatils on where Roosevelt and Harvard are. Pretty lame attempt to lend legitamcy to your claim you go to Harvard (wow you know it's in Boston, better search on Wikipedia for some more facts to live up to what I assume is a lie). If true, hopefully you can learn something and go back to Peru and use your knowledge to deal with Peru's biggest problem (poverty) rather than securing dady's trust fund and your name on the list of the coolest clubs in Lima.
    REX

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    1. You don't need to go to a prestigious school in order to know how to deal with poverty. The easiest way to deal with this issue is to obliterate the poor. Although I honestly wouldn't like that to happen. I strongly believe that enslaving the poor would make Peru a better place! Who needs maids when you can have slaves? I've always wanted to have monkeys under my command. Oh Lord, how I wish I had been alive during the Great Hitler's era... Actually... No. Hitler was kind of stupid for killing Jews. He should have killed anyone non-white instead. You people complain about everything and are never happy with your pathetic lives. Your bitching never stops. It's almost adorable really. Almost. It would truly be adorable if you were white, but unfortunately, you're just a bunch of savages that pretend to be humans. It's obvious brownies can't swim in our beaches. Hell, they shouldn't even be allowed to breathe our air.

      Yours truly, MonkeysNeedToDieASAP@FuckMonkeys.die

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    2. What a cheap and tastless sense of humor.

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  19. Unfortunately, the whole discussion turns out to be futile, as this racism is so deeply embedded in Limenan culture that pitucos tend to add "perfectly reasonable" statements to the discussion without even realizing this underlying racism. It's not about being rich and having a maid - or 8 maids and 7 butlers. It's about the "natural" assumption that these people are inferior human beings who actually can be freaking happy to gain access to a world which simply has not been made for their kind.

    However, the thing that really gives me the creeps is the observation that the emerging class of "cholo pitucos" doesn't seem to do any better...

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  20. My favorite part of the anonymus Harvard (?) student (maybe if he stutied there he would have noticed that it is located in Cambridge, not Boston) is when he says, in the same line, that Peru is not only Lima, and 20% of Peruvians are "white".

    And, just to get the facts straight, in the clubs at Asia they don't charge for guests.

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  21. A ver primero sería interesante que escribiera sus entradas también en castellano ( si lo desea en quechua aymara y las otras lenguas que existen en Perú) El Perú NO es Lima. Si bien estoy de acuerdo con la crítica a la actutud pituca de un sector de la población de clase media emergente en nuestro país.

    Algunas estoy de acuerdo otras no, pero al menos reconoce que hay ricos "honestos" y ricos "sucios" en todas partes, que la clase media trabaja y la clase que más trabaja es la de los pobres, como en todo el mundo ( el problema no es solo en Perú es mucho más complejo de lo que yo escribo acá). Lo que me interesa es que describe la "Actitud pituco" muy bien de hecho creo que critica a los "aspirantes a pituco"
    "Actually, the Pituconess isn't so much attributable to WEALTH, but the attitude of superiority and racism that many of these people cultivate.
    "However, if the Pituco sees you and recognizes you as a potentially wealthy person, they will be overtly polite, but don't be fooled, the second your back is turned you're going to be the gossip of truly repugnant, ridiculous, character bashing gossip beyond anything you can imagine."
    Esto ultimo es trágicamente cierto...
    El racismo interno es terrible y monstruosidades como la playa Asia es tragicómico.
    Ahora...Soy una persona de clase media, que estudió en una universidad nacional, que no conoce macchu picchu pero toda la costa y todos los veranos he ido a la playa porque simplemente soy de la costa, no soy andina.
    Yo respetaría su artículo si viniera de alguien peruano, eso sí sería respetable. El solo hecho de que escriba como un "dios moral lleno de justicia" con una carga evolucionista decimonónica al decir que los pitucos corresponden a una época pasada cuyo tiempo va acabar era el mismo tipo de discurso que se manejaba en los 20 años de guerra civil en mi país 1980 2000 que justificó que gente destestable gobernara en peru del 1990 hasta ahora ... y decir que el 99 por ciento son gente pobre, como si ser pobre santificara a las personas, me parece por demás un descrédito.
    Usted es el tipico "no te juntes con los aculturados de las ciudades porque no estan tan bien conservados como los pueblos indigenas" , He pasado por esa discriminación mil veces. Sepa usted que Si la actitud pituco, es una mierda en nuestro pais a saber una actitud conservadora y detestable, los extranjeros que escriben estas cosas lo son también y lo más seguro es que usted o sus amigos emplee a una " hispana "para criar a sus hijos en su pais porque cuesta menos ya que en paises como peru son tan pobres que van a apreciar las miserias que le paguen sin seguro y sin derechos.
    dígame usted?

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  22. very interesting, that's why Peru keeps moving downhill, that kind of imbeciles control our country,and most of them live in lima, they are accustomed to get the easy money ,that's why they make laws according to the costumer, indultos etc,or work as a secretary in any office recommended by friends or family being portapliegos that's the kind of job they like.
    I'like to use this article because your opinion is very important, (I suggest you to translate it ).I call them pituquesos ,you know why? because if you see them outside peru se orinan de miedo,and they have to go back to peru,the place when they feel important.

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  23. Hate will not take you to anything good. Hate brings violence. Violence brings suffering. Hate is not the solution guys, please think carefully. And I agree with Andrea because it is so stupid to think that most rich people are bad and poor and good...come on, hahaha. No vale la pena odiar a nadie señores, el odio no trae nada bueno. El odio genera violencia y no tiene cuándo acabar. Por favor reflexionen.

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  24. Mary...it kind of sounds like you learned your whole philosophy on hate by watching "The Phantom Menace." Personally, I have no problem saying I hate things like oppression, abuse, torture, and if you have a tolerante attitude about these things then I guess you're just another obstacle I'll have to overcome.

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  25. While in agreement on Ben's take on Pituco's and their treatment of others. Mary, makes an obvious, but none the less important statement to keep the bitterness towards the wealthy in check. In my home country and my the country my home is in now, there is racism, elitism, classism, any-ism you can think of. It is more a condition of humans than a condition of latitude and longitude. To judge anyone without having first seen their behavior and actions would be a lazy way to classify our world into good and bad camps. I know my share of shady characters that happen to be white, black, latino, asian, etc etc. But it wasn't until I actually cared enough about my fellow man that I was able to embrace "judgment on the content of character" not a quick snappy judgment call due their color, address, accent, religion. It was a life's lesson and has allowed me to live a life far richer than most of whom chose to judge the book by its cover. Now having so nicely put my human relationships in writing. I still reserve the right to punch anyone in the face who mistreats another in public. I love people, just sometimes, it's tough love.

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  26. What KJ and Mary said are, of course, valid points, however I think I addressed them in the essay in this article, "Sure, there are a few honorable wealthy people in Peru, just like there are honorable wealthy people in all parts of the world. Actually, the Pituconess isn't so much attributable to WEALTH, but the attitude of superiority and racism that many of these people cultivate."

    I've also elaborated on this thought in further pituco articles.

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  27. Well, some very interesting opinions have been voiced (tx to "Mr Peru" having the courage to be outspoken on what to many is a taboo subject!)
    The common thread does nevertheless appear to be that "knocking" the privileged may make one feel better, but doesn't resolve the problem; poverty, and the ensuing effects: racism, segregation, distrust, etc. between the different economic levels of Peruvian society.
    One isn't going to stop people acting "aloof" or changing their racist attitudes. Instead, I believe one has to improve the situation of the disadvantaged. This starts with education so that they can better compete for higher education and eventually better paid jobs and eventually become fully integrated into Peruvian society. This doesn't happen over-night.
    I wonder how many of you have visited or better still, stayed in one of the Conos in Lima? The people are just like you and me; some good and some bad, some beautiful and some ugly (lol) - like anywhere else.
    Maybe those of you who feel that "Actions are better than Words" will support my project..to build a state-of-the-art Learning/Cultural Centre in Villa Maria del Triunfo (VMdT). (see http://www.wix.com/gringoperuano/ccc which is "under construction").
    We are already seeing some benefits. Cementos Lima (thru' their NGO Assoc Atocongo) have been very pro-active in the area of Corporate Responsibility in the District and have recently agreed to fund ground-breaking Performing Arts classes in one of the schools. As a result, 160 primary school kids in VMdT will start their weekly classes this month. WOW!
    It may well be that these kids are getting the benefit of these type of classes that no other school in Peru is getting - and I include Markham, San Sylvestre, etc.
    Richard (in London, UK - at the moment)
    Let's make change happen!

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  28. The article just drips with hate, prejudice, generalizations and stereotypes about the "pitucos" - in fact he is showing exactly the same attitude he claims the pitucos have about the "cholos". It would have been waaaay more interesting to try to objectively analyze a "pituco" and try to figure out more accurately who they are, what % of the population of Lima do they really represent, how they view themselves and others.
    For example, why the need to cocoon themselves off from the rest of the country in their exclusive beach clubs? Why their extreme sense of entitlement, which often translates to outright rudeness and treating all others like inferiors? How did they make their money in the first place? You make no mention of their almost obssesion with cleanliness and "minimalist" style, their fear of social change, of their political outlook (usually very conservative and market-driven), of their almost obsession with their past and their families (although many pitucos do not like to admit their ancestors were poor immigrants), their "otorongo no come otorongo" attitude in which everything negative that happens within their circle, from indiscretions and minor scandals to outright crimes are hushed up in order to keep up with appearances, their racism and homophobia.
    What makes you a "pituco" - your money? skin colour? your job? your family and business connections? Have you ever shared a beer or a cup of coffee with a pituco? have you ever shared a beer with both a "pituco" and a "cholo" (they say that after a couple of beers, even bitter enemies become friends)? Have you ever read books on the history of Peru? Have you read fiction ("Un mundo para Julius" is a good bet; another short novel I like about the 1950's pituco world is "Los Cachorros" by Vargas Llosa).
    And finally, a question for all: who are the worst, most obnoxious and rude drivers
    1) Combi drivers who pack their passengers like sardines, who play bowling with pedestrians on sidewalks, who view traffic lights as mere suggestions, who have no problem with dropping (sometimes literally) their passengers in the middle of a busy street.
    2) Middle-aged and wealthy pitucas driving a huge Mercedes, sometimes after having drunk a bit, who thinks they can drive in the opposite sense and almost cause several accidents and "you cannot complain because my husband is Mr. So and So"

    I don't really know who is worst

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is it a competition?

      Delete
    2. They`re both two pathetic antiquated extremes of Peruvian society, exposing its glaring weaknesses. One possible solution, tell the pituca in the Benz to go "!·$&//)( herselg (in english and spanish) insuch a way that she/he will leave and think twice about driving like a retard, and as for the combi drivers, send them all to sunny Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for a few days of real "fun in the sun" then upon their return to Lima have them do forced labor or something and keep tabs on their driving.

      Delete
  29. Ok I like your critical point of view, but I do not agree with everything you say.

    Try to write in English and Castilian (Spanish)
    regards
    P.D.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hello Andreanaranjo,
    I don't agree with everything you say either.
    regards

    ReplyDelete
  31. Si, Estar en desacuerdo es esencial en toda buena conversacion...

    disagree is essential in a good conversation
    es asi?
    P.D. trata de hacer tus entradas bilingües

    ReplyDelete
  32. I am not a pituco or anything resembed to that term. I come from Lima's middle class (which does exist btw) and I would like to state that I was very disapointed with the article. I believe that whatever experience you've had around this people was terribly horrible, as I've met a lot high class in Lima, and "judgmental attitude, are extremely discourteous, and they're even dangerous in their indifference to the feelings and needs of other people" does not describe them at all.

    For a start, my boss who is a wealthy man works his butt off. He sleeps three hours a day only to support his daughters as his main wish is to maintain them in Markham College so they can have a good future. Her eldest daughter now goes to the university and works as a 'practicante' in Plaza Vea. She works so hard, so it seems unfair to describe her as a basically stupid and lazy snob. She saves her money and spends it wisely, subject that a lot of peruvians don't know how to do.
    I've worked with so many wealthy families in the past, and you really have no idea what you're talking about. Wealthy people are wealthy as they WORK HARD. Money isn't free you know? People in any kind of society have to ear it.

    Rich or poor, people can be nasty. Why don't you write about all traffic problems in Lima and how not only chofers can be stupid, but MAINLY illegal taxists? For your information, the way taxists drive provoked the highest number of car accidents on 2009 according to Peru's journal El Comercio.

    So please, get your sources right, and stop generalizing such a delicate subject, which apparently you know nothing about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I totally support your words.

      Delete
  33. You are such a hypocrite.

    People have such resentment for Lima's high, class it amazes me. By meeting and observing nasty people, now, we all are supposed to be horrible. I come from Lima's Pitucos society, which you could call as high class. I'm still in school and I work my ass off. My grades are high, I have applied like every other student in Lima to Universidad Católica and I am hoping to be accepted. My brother studies medicine in San Marcos. He studied two years to get accepted. My parents both work six days a week to maintain us in what we can. I've had a maid since I was born. I have a house in Asia and some land in Cuzco.

    Just because I received all this luck, does not make me a terrible person.
    I am in one of Lima's best schools because I put effort. I want to be the best in what I do just like anybody else in low, medium or high class.
    In summers, I go to Asia on the weekends and I work in Lima in the week. In my beach, maids are allowed to go to the beach, as anonymous stated, not in their labour hours, but on their free time. My family and beach club are not abusers and do not treat people like 'shit'. I am aware of the maid situation in Asia, but get your sources right, this happens only in ONE beach. Its not 'Asia's' Law, but one STUPID club in Asia's law. You just need to watch for crazy people from any class, low, medium of high.

    I really don't understand where did you get all this crazy ideas from. My parents work hard to support us, and there is no day that I don't thank them for that. My family has been very blessed, however with no continuos hard work, nothing would be as it is, and I'm grateful.

    So don't you dare feel the right to criticize all Pitucos, because clearly, you are the racist and oppressor that, according to you, I am supposed to be.

    ReplyDelete
  34. " 1) Combi drivers who pack their passengers like sardines, who play bowling with pedestrians on sidewalks, who view traffic lights as mere suggestions, who have no problem with dropping (sometimes literally) their passengers in the middle of a busy street."

    People who come from low classes, who killed a innocent girl last month, and three passengers last week.
    Combi and taxi divers kill weekly passengers by their way of driving and pay police man little quantities of money to get away with it. They dont hurt passengers and innocent civilians, but KILL them because of their bad driving.

    If you are going to write about how have you seen 'pitukos' hit people on the streets with cars, you should know that in Lima, policemen are NOT RESPECTED IN ANY SENSE. They don't even respect themselves, when they ask for money instead of a ticket,
    so please, tell both sides of the story next time.

    ReplyDelete
  35. YOU crearly state in your article about Ovalo Gutierres: "A combi that tried to run me over as I was crossing the street. Dirty bastard! I threw a rock at him. I advise you to do the same."

    So.. don't generalize. ALL people in Lima drive hard, if pitukos or any other driver drove softly, they would be hitten by combis 6 times in a day. I can assure this.

    This comes from 18 years driving in Lima. What a harsh city to drive in. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  36. There does seem to be a Disney-like classification of good guys (the poor) and the bad guys (the pitucos) here. The description of the pitucos might be accurate but I strongly disagree with the description of the poor "99% of the people you meet in Peru are going to be the kindest, most noble, most generous people you're ever going to meet in your life". From actual experience between the UK and Peru, the Peruvians fail badly on all those counts, and those qualities are something I very much miss from the UK. Not sure how much close-up experience the blogger has of Peruvians but I've dealt with Peruvian friends and family very up close, even trusting close family (in-laws) with my money, and it has not been a good experience.

    I know what you're referring to with the pitucos but it's not just white people, rich Peruvians are just as bad (getting in a taxi in La Molina (visiting a Police Officers' leisure complex, I don't live there) once a bitter-looking middle-aged Peruvian woman came up behind in her shiny Yaris (about the cheapest, most common new car you can get in Lima anyway) and started sounding her horn as if the taxi driver was in the way in what was a deserted, wide, dusty old street) and eventually drove past shouting insults). Having money breeds this sense of superiority in whites and non-whites alike; the problem in Peru I suppose is that it's easier for whites to charade as superior, rich people by mere dint of skin colour.

    And to answer the question from the poster above about who are the worst drivers, combi drivers or middle-classed Mercedes drivers, well I read an essay recently that stated that 40% of all road accidents in Lima were caused by combis. You only need to watch the news every night to see that every few days a combi will mow somebody off a pavement. Not to mention the non-transit related crime involving combis, like the guy who was murdered by a combi driver for not accepting a slight increase in fare.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I always had the impression that Pitucos were simply wealthier, white Peruvians but not necessarily all of them snobs. Many of my friends were well off with nice cars, constantly travelling to other countries for holidays, always wearing the nicest clothes and going to the best parties in beautiful houses in Monterrico, La Molina, Surco....all those places; but not only that, they also had foreign last names which for some reason gave them a sense of sophistication and superiority.

    Of course being in the circle I came along to these parties and hung out with the "coolest kids" at the time. I wasn't particularly wealthy but the fact that my father travelled around the world and for some strange reason gave me something to brag about, given that at the time travelling around the world was quite the luxury. I guess this gave me enough qualification to be in this circle.

    I'd like to think I was descent looking (maybe this helped me as well) but not indigenous and not white as in blonde; however, I hardly experienced snobbish behaviour. Occasionally though, what I saw is discrimination for not going to certain schools or having a membership to a certain club or leaving in a certain are in Lima.

    The irritating part about all this is that Pitucos is a bad word because it's associated with being snob. Not only are some of these people white and wealthy but due to their own merit or their parents, they also have a social status....huge huge part of this whole Pituco stereotype. And this is all bad because the fact that they're in a poor country is a main reason the snob ones feel they have the right to be that way and that they are superior. Funny thing is, as soon as they leave the country, if they're treated just like anyone else and other Peruvians who were probably miss treated by Pitucos don't feel inferior, actually, they feel empowered.

    Outside of Peru everyone is just another Peruvian, some success, growth, learn and become successful and others don't and although going to the best schools in Peru is a huge advantage. It doesn't mean someone who went to the worst will not be more successful in life, wealthier and heck!! become white.....anything is possible these days with money. Seriously tho, no need to become white but simply be proud and educate oneself, knowledge is power and actually power. Let the Pitucos be proud, let them be, it doesn't make them any better but let also the common people not to be distracted by it, to feel inferior and to think they are the same and yet be better, for themselves.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Oh boy lots of typos, but I think you get my point.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Fernando FlorianMay 6, 2010 at 11:31 PM

    WOW! I have just read ALL the comments and quite frankly I liked the original article of "Why I Hate Pitucos." Very strong words and a bit exagerated, but mostly true.

    Here are my two cents worth: I was born in Lima, but I was educated in the US so; I left Peru at a very early age and it saved me from the "Pituco attitude' of many members of my own family. I also know many "Pituco wanna be's" I don't really hate them, because I have learned to know them on a deeper level (yes, they too have feelings!) instead of just on the surface or casually. As I said before, I am "related" to some of them! So; I think that instead of "hating" them, we should just ignore them and let them know that they are NOT as important as they think they are. At the same time, we should take the time to assure the "non-pitucos" (myself included) that we are just as good, if not better, than people with money or a lighter skin. Like GringoPeruano well said, "I believe one has to improve the situation of the disadvantaged. This starts with education so that they can better compete for higher education and eventually better paid jobs..." So, the questions is, what is each one of us doing to make this happen? (Besides wasting energy on negative comments and insults?)
    I am afraid the answer is: Not Enough!!!
    Cheers!
    Fernando Florian - Canada

    ReplyDelete
  40. History has told us that hate has not brought anything good. If you hate "pitucos" it is your own choice, as it is the own choice of most of my african-american friends to hate whites in America, just because they are discriminated and less wealthy. The pituco/race situation in Peru is quite intrincated. Having travelled a lot I could see that it happens everywhere: people hate other people for whatever reason. Instead of an article and discussion about how much we hate others, let's post solutions.

    I do not agree with the unfair system aswell, anywhere, and the maid problem appears to be in only one beach. So I propose:

    1. Do not go to Larcomar. Then you are supporting the unfair system with your money.
    2. Leave Miraflores and move to Comas. You will be helping spreading the wealth there.
    3. Do not work at bilingual schools. They usually get their money from rich, upper class peruvians. Please go to teach at a state school somewhere.
    4.Do not consume any products from Corporate companies, they usually exploit their workers everywhere in the world (McDo, KFC, etc).
    5.Go back to the US and engage in programs to help the neediest, and fight "pitucos" also in the US.

    6. And please don't be hypocrites. It's so easy to be critical when you are at the other side of the shore.

    Another German

    ReplyDelete
  41. Great article, great comments and great arguments from everyone. This is highly interesting and entertaining. I will not go into my point of view regarding pitucos since I have not thought it out well enough, but I will say this:

    People who look down upon others simply because of a perceived social class difference are prejudiced. It's as simple as that.

    It doesn't matter whether they are pitucos or not. There is a general negative attitude towards those from the sierra, for example, and I'm sure that a large portion of the population with that attitude is not pituco.

    The unjust and dated social order in Peru is not something that is unique to Peru. It is evident in many "developing countries".

    Further reading on racism in Peru you might find interesting: http://www.unrisd.org/unrisd/website/document.nsf/ab82a6805797760f80256b4f005da1ab/ee7eb1e30a96c11f80256b6d00578643/$FILE/dcadena.pdf

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  42. A note on combis/public transit vs. private passenger vehicles and road traffic incidents. I am an epidemiologist who studies injuries, particularly road traffic injuries. These data come from reports by the Secretaria Tecnica del Consejo de Transportes de Lima y Callao (STCTLC).

    Just to clarify the statistics here, looking at fatal pedestrian crashes, public transit and private passenger vehicles roughly represent about the same proportion of the blame - 35% each. If you divide the public transit into types of buses, microbuses (mid-size buses usually) cause 2% of pedestrian deaths, omnibuses (the bigger buses) cause 22%, and camioneta rural (combis) cause 12%. According to the CTLC, there are 29,000 public transit vehicles in Lima and about 1 million private vehicles. So, per vehicle public transit causes more death than private cars. For injuries, private vehicles are the cause of 51% of all incidents and public transport is the cause of 22% (in Lima & Calla). So, still there is some unequal burden caused by public transport by this consideration.

    That is not the whole story, however, because it is fallacious to cite a road traffic statistic this way since the denominator does not accurately represent what we in epidemiology term exposure time. What we are really interested in is the rate. The denominator used by the CTLC is only part of the equation because we want to know amount of time and distance driven per vehicle (let's say miles driven per year per vehicle). Consider one combi or bus on a given day. It probably drives about 30 miles in just one route from its start to end. If it runs the route 4 times in one day, that is 120 miles driven (and I am sure they run probably 6-8). There are very few private vehicles that will drive that much. They will probably only drive a couple of miles in the city on an average trip on a day that they might drive. If they are commuting to work, maybe a little more, but they still will not drive as much per day as a bus and certainly not every private vehicle. If we do a theoretical exercise, let's say the public transit buses drive 150 miles every day on average of a one year period. Let's say that private vehicles drive 10 miles on average per day during that same year. That is a total of 1,587,750,000 miles for public transit and 365,000,000 during that year. In 2006, there were 14,304 road traffic incidents due to public transport vehicles and 33,103 due to private vehicles. Dividing those numbers by our theoretical miles driven gives us a rate of 0.9 incidents per million miles driven by public transit and 90.7 incidents per million miles driven by private vehicles. Private vehicles are 100 times more likely to be responsible for a traffic incident than public transport. Even if I had doubled the miles driven by private vehicles and halved that by public transit, private vehicles would still have a higher rate. If we revisit the pedestrian deaths in Lima, 107 were due to public transit and 104 due to private vehicles (in 2006). You can see already where this going, but there are 0.07 deaths per million miles driven by public transit and 0.3 per million miles driven by private vehicles. So, private vehicles are 4 times as likely to cause a pedestrian death than a public transit vehicle.

    There are other factors we could consider as well, but overall it is pretty safe to say that as crazy as public transit vehicles in Lima may drive, they are less likely to cause a road traffic incident than private vehicles.

    ReplyDelete
  43. AlexQ that was some interesting analysis. Though the one aspect I did not see accounted for is the fact that most of the private cars are actually Taxis. And those taxis are on the road most of the day. (Side note even a number of the taxi drivers live and sleep out of their cars). So the 10 mile per day private car number does not really reflect the reality when you adjust for all the taxis. So to do your analysis any justice you need to break these numbers out into three categories (private/taxi/buses) and not just (private versus buses) There seems to have been multiple studies on peruvian taxi and bus drivers that show a high rate of drivers with psychological problems. Here is one article about it http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2005/04/07/1339934.htm?site=news I remember reading a study before from some U.S. university and it had the figure higher at 60% but that one was specific to only taxi drivers. Though from much personal experience I would not have had to read those stories to have come to the same conclusion. Also just look at any of the taxis on the roads in Peru and simply try to find one that is not dented or scratched all over and generally beat up. I think when you pull out the taxi drivers from the private drivers of your above analysis you will start to see a different story.

    Clyde

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  44. Mr. Clyde thank you for your comments. You are correct in that taxis are sometimes considered passenger vehicles (I say sometimes because I am sure as many readers of this blog should know not all taxis are always driven as taxis in Lima). I did try to account for this in how I came up with the imaginary 10 miles per day per vehicle but not with any real numbers - I just made up an estimate. Let me try and do a better a job. I also made an error. I did not list one of the 0s for the private vehicles, so it should be 3,650,000,000 and its rates should be divided by 10 (9.7 and 0.03 respectively). This means that though the private vehicles in this scenario cause more incidents per mile, the public transit vehicles have a higher death rate per mile. This is probably in part due to the size, weight, and shape of these vehicles. Many studies here have found when you adjust for these vehicle design factors, there are few differences in the fatality rate.

    Based on more CTLC data, taxis represent about 7.5% of the roughly million private passenger vehicles. The average taxi drives about 150 miles per day used. Other private passenger vehicles on average only get about 83 one-way trips per year per vehicle. Let's say each one-way trip is on average 5 miles. So, the total number of miles driven by taxis is 4,106,250,000 during a one year period assuming they are used daily and the total number of miles driven by private vehicles is 3,838,750,000. So, the rate based on this mileage is 4.2 incidents per million miles per year.

    Unfortunately the police reports do not distinguish between taxi, colectivo, or non-taxi/colectivo passenger vehicles, so I cannot reliably calculate the rate for each type of vehicle since I lack the numerators. We could assign made up proportions. In the most extreme case, if we assign all incidents to one or the other, we get 8.1 incidents for taxis and 8.6 for other passenger vehicles. Because the denominator for taxis is larger than that of the private vehicles in this scenario, at least 51.5% of the incidents would have to be due to a taxi for the passenger vehicles to have a lower rate. If I have underestimated the miles per trip for other private vehicles, this would shift the rate more favorably them, but unfortunately I can only guess and estimate.

    As for the studies you bring up, I can't really comment on them well or their results since I can't read the original published article and relying on a sensationalized news blurb is not something I really want to do. The underlying hypothesis that I am assuming you are making is that psychological problems cause bad driving which causes road traffic incidents. Unfortunately these studies cannot prove or disprove this hypothesis. As far as I know, the only psychological disorder that has been studied well that is associated with a higher rate of crashes is ADHD, and that is only in teenagers. Teens with ADHD are about 9-16% more likely to have a crash than their peers. People who score higher on sensation seeking scales tend to have more crashes, but they have not necessarily been diagnosed with a psychological disorder. I’m sure there are potentially others. One problem here is that we have no baseline or population sample of any drivers or non-taxi/bus drivers to compare these results to. We also have no idea about how many crashes they have been in or their actual driving behaviors, so even if they have these problems observed in the study, we cannot say anything about the relationship between these problems and their actual behavior. We should also note that these are not clinical diagnoses made in these studies, these problems are based on self-reported surveys most likely.

    Anyway, even if you have psychological issues, the risk factors that put you at highest risk for a crash are driving under the influence of alcohol, speeding (anything over the posted speed limit is technically speeding in most studies), and low driving experience.

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  45. You are totally wrong about the pitucos. I read a novel that talks about this called "El Gran Maestro" and apparently I found this to be true: There are lots of people in the lower classes who are pitucos as well. They act cocky, trying to be cool, wearing their sunglasses and talking like the pitucos from universities like Universidad de Lima but at the same time are taxi drivers handling a tico (small beetle-kind of car).

    Yes, the brothers are shown in this book as this careless guys that only think about surfing, girls and parties and are total idiots because they don't even worry about university life, but at the same time there are these lower-class people who also act and emulate the pitucos and the book calls these people the brotherificos.

    You mentioned that many pitucos are having financial problems and are even mortgaged so I think it's obvious that many people, not just 1% or even 10% of the population is, or at least acts like a pituco. I think its a way bigger chunk.

    ReplyDelete
  46. Oh...so you "read a novel" and I lived in Peru for 10 years...yet you think you can be critical of my perspective.

    Bonehead

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    Replies
    1. So you lived in Peru for 10 years and you think you are worth two shits. How cute. Wait. Not cute. You're not white, ew, if you'll excuse me, I need to throw up. Okay. I'm back!

      So liek bby qurl, you should know that perception =/= reality, nahmean?. Unfortunately, you're way too ignorant to be taken seriously, and, even if you could be taken seriously, you're nothing more than a worthless piece of shit who will never achieve anything in life... Wait... that's what you already are! My bad. :) Oh well. Lalala.

      In all seriousness, I hope you can end up making a change in Peru's society!

      Who am I kidding? Just go and continue living the miserable life you've been living while we live like Gods.

      Delete
  47. I see the "I read a novel" bonehead is too much of a coward to respond...typical.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Dude,
    I feel your anger, it angers me too the overt and covert racism that exists in Peru. And its refreshing to read that a foreigner has tapped into this social disfunction. HOWEVER, Ive read a few of your writings, and I feel that you need to be a little more informed in your judgement (I hope you realize you are being judgemental as well). As an economist, it is uneducated and misinformed to state that "Pitucos spen money and Never work".
    Peru's economy is a little more complex than that.
    I do agree though that being Pituco is more an Attitude: "attitude of superiority and racism that many of these people cultivate" as you so rightly stated.
    I've always had a housekeeper growing up in Lima, went to an expensive American school in Camacho, did all my post schooling in US and Europe, does that make me a "Pituco"???
    I believe there needs to be a balance and most importantly : EDUCACION, whether you live in Cercado or Surco. Know how to treat others with manners, respect and dignity. I applaud your take, but if you want to be taken more seriously, do so with accurate knowledge, information and less biased heated judgement.

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  49. This is just a blog, it's not meant to be taken seriously. I don't even think the things out before I write them. Something irritates me and I go on a furious rant. I don't claim to be correct about everything, I know I'm not.

    However, it has been my experience in life that middle class people put in the most hours and are responsible for the greatest production in all the societies I've visited. People at the top just sort of maintain their position...at least that's how it appears to me.

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  50. You are cool dude, Keep ranting

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  51. me encanta lo que escribiste aqui.

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  52. AS a peruvian, I have to agree and disagree with this article. I am not from Lima, but from the "Jungle" or " Forest" city of Iquitos. I only dated two peruvians, an one was " Pituco" . He was kind, generous, good to everyone, but was misjudged from other peruvians, only cause he was white, and belonged to a prestigious club. I have to agree there are many white peruvians, that think that are better than anyone else, cause I had experienced racism myself. I was mostly accepted, cause for most you have to be somewhat attractive. In one occasion one of my friend was not allowed in one of the hip clubs, simply because she was not consider a beauty queen, anyways I loved this article and all the opinions. Currently I live in San Francisco CA, where I feel accepted how I am, and feel much happier than Peru, where segregation is just ridiculous!! I love Peru very much, and really wish people will love each other more, and stop hating each other, cause you are not rich, or do not fit their standards.

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  53. I visit Peru almost every two years. I understand the point that the original poster is trying to make. He may have exaggerated a bit, but what he is saying is true. One of the commentators above states that they find it interesting a non-Peruvian managed to realize the existence of this class distinction.

    It isn't even surprising, anyone being in Peru for just one week will notice it, it's ridiculously blatant and certain "pitucos" will do this in public, shamelessly to boot. I'm a "white" Peruvian who was raised in the United States and return to Peru to visit family. I've seen this attitude first hand by family members and family acquaintances. They are respectful in public, but believe me, behind closed doors or in their circles, it's the same elitist racist crap.

    Many people comment on how a possible solution to this is for people of lower economic means to educate themselves in order to compete for high paying jobs. Hahaha, I bet it also rains lolly pops in their world too. Even if someone studied hard, they would be discriminated and not hired simply because of an andean surname or the color of their skin. There are systems set up to keep the gravy train rolling for the elites. Lets see how well it goes when Mamani or Paucar submit that job application. Hell, it isn't even illegal in Peru to request a picture with a CV.

    This is also true in any position of higher power, check out the high ranks of the Peruvian military during national ceremonies. Take a look at the grunts, then check out the top brass, blatant racial division all in a single spot! It is sad, yet true, but worst is how many mestizo Peruvians buy into this shit and discriminate among themselves. None the less, who the hell am I to critique another culture? Oh yeah, don't let this deter anyone from visiting the country, whatever faults Peru has, it more than makes up for ;).

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  54. Great article.

    However, "pituconess" is not exclusive to white/rich people. In fact, I´m not worried about them. The ones Im really worried about are those pitucos who are not even that wealthy (nor even that white), but think of themselves as superior because they can afford some luxuries.

    This "phenomenon" is not based exclusively on race issues, but on wealth. Some peruvians strive to be "exclusive" and simply cannot handle their (sometimes recently aquired) wealth.

    It is curious to see how many people from working class origins, who have struggled to get an education, and are now "successfull" (success, as it happens everywhere, is based on how much money you make) tend to discriminate and think of themselves as exclusive/superior. Mr Peru hit the target when he mentioned the wanna-be pitucos, who will even discriminate among themselves (being white or mestizo).

    Those are the real problem. Those are the ones that must be avoided.

    The good thing is that although there are many wanna-be pitucos out there, you can find (even among the white rich ones!)that most Peruvians are sensible people, who are honestly concerned about the problems that affect the country and try to do something about it.

    R.

    P.S. FYI. Im Peruvian and I have lived in Peru my whole life.

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  55. Loved your article and there is no better definition about "PITUCOS". Totally true, I think is most stupiest thing ever to do not allow their maids to go to the same beach they go, like really??? they went back in History hundred of years... Don't get me wrong I am a peruvian living in the USA (about 11 years now)but will never be a pituca or a wannabe pituca paying someone else to do the stuff I can do myself and having someone else to raise my kids when I can do it....Shame on you all pitucos that felt insulted by this article!!!

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  56. I am well aware of the pitucos and pitucos-wannabe. I went to La Catolica University, to the Arts School to be more exact. There I met lots of pitucos, pitucos-wannabe and ALSO many white/rich people who were neither pitucos or wannabes but the nicest, humble and down-to-earth people. So Lima is a melting pot of races, cultures and ethnic groups to put it that way. Now, moving to the topic of this post, yes, the maids are not allowed to go in the water when they are working, usually before 6. This is at Asia (popular beach), they are allowed to go in the water after 6, in their free time, after work. I do not see any problem with it. If you work at an amusement park, you can't go on rides WHILE you are working, right? same thing.

    Yes, pitucos and wannabes are just plain assholes, but this is a cultural problem coming from the spaniard invasion times.

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  57. I don't have a problem with individual employers telling their workers not to swim during work hours. I do have a problem with a general ordinance to that effect for the whole beach.

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  58. I am a pituco and i dont really think that we hate everybody and are that big of racists. You guys are all just jealous because you are poor and ugly and cholos

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    1. How do you know you are a pituco? Can you describe what makes you one? Also are you a pituco or a pituco-wanna be?
      Bruce

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  59. Sorry, but to Anonymous directly above, Fuck you,racist. It's because of people such as yourself that such social inequalities exist in Peru. Snobs such as yourself both create and perpetuate the social conditions that lead to violence and atrocities in the world. I'm willing to bet that you consider Pinochet to be one of the Twentieh Centuries greatest heroes

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  60. Wow dude you are spot on. I ran into your blog by searching comments bout Sofia Vergara's insulting line bout Peru -also agree 1000% w u there- but never imagined finding this hidden gem that is your blog. It is ironic that we in the US are on the way of becoming into that "pituco" society; however the difference is that we are too stupid here to realize what's happening (finally with OWS there's a glimpse of hope I guess). I look forward to reading more of your posts dude. I'm Peruvian (US citizen now), I have lived here in the US for almost 20 yrs but my wife -American- and I are exploring moving to Lima in the near future. We were there recently and had a blast. I actually grew up as a half pituco (the 10% segment) and one thing I tell you is that it is hard to realize how much of an ass you truly are. Coming to the US opened my eyes in that sense and I look forward to make a difference in Peru when I get back. Anyhow other than that I can not talk too much bout football b/c u r a Packer fan riding good times, me? I'm a Dolfan, nuff said. Suck 4 Luck!!!

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  61. LOL, to the First Anonymous aka Pituco In Denial: Dude you are going to Hahvuhd? Whatahya rehtahded? No seriously now, Harvard must be lowering their standards to accept someone like yourself with such poor writing.

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  62. Thanks Tiger! Let me know if you need anything on your return to Peru!

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  63. Honestly, any time I come across pitucos and limeños racistas y soberbios in my home country I enjoy screwing with them and exposing them for what they are.

    And, for those who come across said group: just because they speak english, or any other second language (indigenous excluded, of course) does not mean that they represent the views of an entire people.

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  64. Hi, Mr. Perù!

    I am Peruvian, in general "un pituco" is not necessarily someone rich. Many pituquillos live appearances (I don`t know how to say "vivir de apariencias", sorry :P)But the point is that "un pituco" is a white racist Peruvian that`s all(they are Peruvians that hate Peruvians and think they own Peru. They can be everywhere but don`t let normal people enter to "their place", something stupid by the way). Seriously many of them don`t have money but are accepted by other rich pitucos just because their look or last name. No tienen ni donde caerse muertos, pues!!!!! but pitucos anyway.

    PD: Anonymous (all of you) at least invent a nickname.

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  65. I always thought pitucas were just wanna-bes. Someone once described them to me as the "Prada-sin-plata" set.

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  66. Why are u so shocked ??????

    You are just another hypocritical condescending slag from some racist first world shithole who cannot cope with the same social phenomenon that underlies the society u belong to. I've been to england and lemme tell you the social differences and degree of stupidity of the wealthy ppl along with their crap mentality and behaviour reminds me the pitucos in peru, so whats the friggin issue??, Do you think you are entitled to behave arrogant towards non european societies just because u are some lame working class-like individual and them pitucos are wealthier and luckier than you. You are being racist, even more racist than the people u r trying to bash, cuz i find you extremely untolerant towards the same crap that pervades your society in the same manner as in the peruvian. You are a european white, hence you think to hell with the rest!, none have the right to behave more arrogant than us whiteys... you are just a useless pìece of racist slag, and u know u are.

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  67. This blog and more importantly its comments are funnnyyyyy.
    lulz

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  68. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  69. I am reading this blog a year after it was posted, and I have to say to the author, You Rock! You have hit on something that has always been the source of annoyance in my many years of loving Peru. I have seen it all - pitucos pushing maids out of line in a grocery store, pituco children who at age 6 still don't know how to tie their shoelaces, older pituco children who give orders to the maid to bring a glass of water and then don't use please and thank you, pitucos who give their maids week-old food to eat instead of inviting them to share today's, pitucos who SELL their used clothes to the maids, and on and on and on. Thankfully, pitucos are not the majority. But they are real, and they are disgusting.

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  70. the posh have always existed, not only in Peru, remember that Aristotle's "Nicomachean moral" talks about these characters as a rule of life, without which nothing serious is at stake, prefer falsehood to truth, now, just imagine that if they prefer the little things, how to be more serious issues?
    According to the Greek philosopher opposite of this vice is the spirit of "openness" as a rule of life.

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  71. OMG ur forgetting to tell about those NEW NON-WHITE PITUCOS who r TOTTALY ACCEPTED BY LIMA's ELITE. The ones who hang out in ASIA, see at the same private parties and go to those well known colleges and high schools.

    Ale

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  72. all above is outdate,now lima is plenty of peruvians from provinces who has dominated the capital min number and economics go tyo any restaurant in lima you will see ll from the chef and patrons are from provinces all pitucos are out of view or in places in samall quantities,this is lima now all has changed forever,if pitucos is a name or something which nobody understand because all are gone to overseqas and the remanent are hidden in Lima. All these stereotypes are in extintion only because all peruvians the mayority of them are from provincews harwoking and making money of course there are poor as well but tellme if you visited others countries even developed there are some type of people poor then why we wasting time thinking and writing about it if all this is over,asia is a beach where poor and some rich,maybe no so rich use the beach and the shopping centre and live the noemal life even you can a rent a aprtmenty 8,000 dolllars for three months an live like rich but if you gon 20 metres crosss the road and you will par 400 dollars for three months now decide and show your money

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  73. First and foremost Peru has to go through a profound historical movement, in the likes of: Women's Liberation Movement, Civil Rights Movement, Labor Rights Movement, Indio/Afro-Peruvian/Asian-Peruvian Civil Rights Movements, etc., etc. Change will not come for the people of Peru until the people themselves, collectively, MAKE the change themselves. Peru unfortunately, is still living in the 14th century, they're still challenged mentally by the colonization of Spain. Beautiful, but very sad place to be.

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  74. Every one's article are interesting; but I can not believe, that even now in the 21st Century there still attitude issues...SAD? Spend you energies on things that are vast more important!! REFLECT, set your mind in life & priorities, that are more valuable and positive. Leave attitudes, behind
    such social class, hate, oppression, abuse etc... We need to show the world that we are far much more civilized than that. Critique this comment if you want, I won't care?
    An America-Peruvian wealthy & filty rich and poor ex-pituca

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  75. It's incredible that this thread is already two years old and yet with all the opinions and points of view expressed here I don't agree with a single one of them. I think a lot of comments here are based on a really shallow, knee-jerk analysis of Peruvian society, even the ones made by Peruvians themselves. First of all, not all "pitucos" are rich and/or white. However, anyone who is rich, or white, and either well-dressed or well-educated will probably be labeled as such by their peers, especially by those who have low self-esteem and/or feel they have been "cheated" in life. While they usually claim that is the elite who has cheated them, the disparity in wealth among limeños can be largely attributed to the government's historical failure to deliver essential services, such as education, and to the lack of innovation and entrepreneurial spirit in lieu of education among many non-“pitucos”. Also, many non-pitucos also are very guilty of self-discrimination and I find them to be far more superficially judgmental than “pitucos” are. It should also be mentioned that much of the poverty and social conflict in Lima is the result of immigration from the provinces in the mid-20th century. Surely when the first wave of serrano immigrants arrived to Lima, they considered almost everyone to be a “pituco”. Obviously the economy was not able to absorb so many poor, uneducated immigrants at once and many people have remained poor and not acquired the skills or motivation to become wealthy, in spite of the current pro-business, free-market environment. Many people allege racial discrimination, but really what occurs is cultural and class discrimination. While the majority of "pitucos" I know are white, there are plenty of them who are of darker-skinned mestizos, Chinese, or even mulattos. What sets them apart is not the color of skin, but rather their education, social habits, and also, level of globalization. By level of globalization I mean how well a person understands and responds to global trends in culture, lifestyle and consumption. "Pitucos" are probably not going to accept someone who wears fake Dolce & Gabbana t-shirts and uses words like "esmarfón". Mr. Peru claims that you will be socially shunned by pitucos if you are dating someone who is not accepted as one of their own. While I have found this to be true in some cases, this is really only with people who are really truly lack manners, education, and good taste ("huachafos"). While it is true that you have to have money to join a private club and you have to be socially-connected to get into the best dance clubs in Lima, most wealthy, well-educated Peruvians I know love their country and actually want their country to become a first world nation sometime in the future but find reform and innovation to be constantly hindered by resistance from entrenched backwardness, government corruption, and poor people who want a piece of the pie without having to study/work for it.

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  76. jeeze I'm not so thrilled about living in Peru anymore...

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  77. Hi.

    Interesting article. You don't have to be white to be a pituco. My wife's father is a self-made man, with humble origins. He was born out in the sticks but moved to the city when he was quite young and worked his way up (and in addition was in the right place at the right time, with more than a little luck. He's had his own business for years. Anyway, the point is, he's not a white Peruvian, but has forgotten his humble roots and (with the rest of the family)looks down upon the empleada who is paid peanuts and lives in a shitty room on the roof and, after cooking the lunch, she always has to eat her portion in the corner of the kitchen and not at the table with everyone else. Likewise, my father-in-law's employee from his shop was at the house once and he was made to eat in the other room. It always felt weird to experience these situations. Like soemthing from the past. I'm English, by the way, and in my own country, it seems rare to have an empleada unless you're very, very rich. I'd describe my wife's family as middle-class, not super-rich. Maybe having an empleada and the attitude towards them is a status thing and a way of trying to look as if you've "arrived". It always felt weird to me. I'm used to looking after myself(and my wife), but it seemed to make the empleada uncomfortable when I used to make myself a coffee and more so when I'd ask her if she'd like one! She always used to jump and try to look busy if anyone'd walk in to the kitchen unexpectesdly, as if she was afraid of looking lazy, even though there'd be nothing to do. The poor girl was only about 16, as well. My heart goes out to these people.

    Changing the subject, congrats on this interesting website. For all Peru's faults, Peruvians aren't half as "up themselves" as my own countrymen; Peru has a vibe and I miss it.

    Cheers, all.

    Fred the postman.

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    1. It happens in all latinamerican countries. Watch the olds mexican telenovelas and you'll find the same. The empleadas (maids) never dinner in the same table with the owners. They live in a different part of the house, far away of the bedrooms of the owners. But I'm agree with you. That attitude is so retrograde!

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  78. Quote:

    "many people have remained poor and not acquired the skills or motivation to become wealthy, in spite of the current pro-business, free-market environment."

    Sorry, but its' the same in any country. It's not just a case of needing only the will to suceed. If you don't have money, connections and a privileged background, you're at a disadvantage. How does one acquire the skills to become wealthy, growing up without much money, or even in poverty? I live in a first world country and even here, you'll find a sizeable underclass and even plenty of graduates doing poorly paid work! Only a minority are entrepreneurs and business men!

    Cheers.

    Fred the Postman

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  79. I think pitucos are only part of the upper class in Lima. Upper class in another cities like Arequipa, Trujillo, Piura, Cuzco and Iquitos aren't like that. Only the 10% of peruvians are like you have sayed. And a 20% are wealthy people, and of that people, 40% are pitucos (thankfully they're dissapearing). Now you're a pituco only because you have money, you live in a flat on San Isidro, Miraflores or Barranco, or on a huge house in Surco or La Molina; if you study in schools like Villa María, Markham, Recoleta, Santa María, Newton or Roosevelt; and if you drive a Mercedes Benz, a Ferrari or a Porsche. But now being a pituco doesn't mean you have bad feelings or you're racist. But I'm agree that almost all tourists and foreigners doesn't feel well in Lima's upper class lifestyle.

    PS: If you want to know more about pitucos, try to watch "Al Fondo hay Sitio" or if you know spanish "Esta Sociedad".

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  80. Mr Peru, you ll never talk a "pretended to be pituco" out of his "ideas".
    Flush, please.. it s healthier for 99% of peruvians.

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  81. Thanks god I don't live there anymore.... GOD BLESS AMERICA!!!!!!!! HAHAHAHAHAHAAHAH

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    1. Damn right! You can say again, bro.

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  82. TONNNGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOo es PITUKO

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  83. I was born in Lima but raised in the US and I have no recollection of living in Peru at all- nor have I ever returned to visit in the decades since. There are no close relatives to visit—truly if I were to go back it would be as a tourist who speaks fluent Spanish and can quickly pick-up the local tone and vocabulary.
    I married a wonderful person who is also an immigrant to the US, a Pacific islander. Though there was loving support for my engagement from the parent perspective, my siblings quickly became something between indifferent to passive-aggressive and even hostile with me about this. For what it is worth, my looks are perhaps euro-generic (is that even used anywhere?). These siblings, all of them older, were unapproachable about the subject. The negative energy was surreal and could fill many pages. I eventually asked a friendly in-law about it and the reaction was approximately: “We were expecting that you would eventually meet a ‘nice Latin/Mexican’ or something”. I held back choosing not press on with "what, then… something whiter...'non-indigenous'?". I could have asked-- just to make a point-- but I already knew the answer.
    I have read that, in Peru, one will be socially shunned if one dates a person who is not accepted as one of “their own”. I believe that this is what happened with my siblings. Thus, in my experience, this ugly behavior is not limited to the “huachafos” but also surfaces in those who would otherwise purport to have better manners, education, and so-called good taste. Ironically, my spouse exceeds all of my siblings in both professional standing and in post-graduate education. Perhaps my siblings are bitter and envious anomalies of an existing or accepted norm? Irrespective of their motivation or self-indulgent world-view, they decided that I (and my spouse) must be socially shunned. At first there was feigned tolerance and then this degraded to outright shunning once the parents passed on. The years that have passed since I last spoke to any of them are quickly becoming decades. The last of the diminishing contacts with them comprised of increasingly infrequent and awkward telephone calls from them of the “I-apologize-for-anything-I-might-have-done-to-upset-you” variety. None of them seemed to have any clue of the damage they had done and how they had done it—let alone identify it. Nevertheless, forgiveness was the easy part. Trying to keep them in my life would be impossible.
    It means so much to be able to choose with whom we share life's journey because we have no choice with whom we start-out our lives. I came across this blog, perhaps not for the first time, searching for some better general understanding of Peruvian society and, by extension, of my ‘lost’ siblings and some insight on the basis of their behavior. I have searched over the years with similar findings- often finding contributions from English-writing ex-pats. As an outsider where my birthplace is concerned, the ex-pat perspective seems the most accessible and relevant to me. I was somehow compelled to reflect upon the subject in writing this time around… in a manner of acceptance, perhaps—and in what I hope was an appropriate forum. Thanks for reading.

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    1. Sorry for your troubles, but thanks for sharing your story here. It's never easy when your family turns crazy, I have experience in that myself so I know! Sounds like you've made the right choices and are on the right track! Don't give up on Peru just because of your family, however, it's a magical country and I hope someday you can go there and get in touch with the good side of your roots!

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  84. HAHAHAH THIS IS HILARIOUS. I put something on google and I came across this blog entry or w/e this is. Don't even know where to begin ha.I don't know if this was meant as a sarcastic article or what. Regardless I don't think It's about being a "pituco". I think It's about treating people with respect, no matter how much money you have or don't have. There are snobs everywhere not just in Peru. Some people sound like they are upset that some people are born well off. Well maybe their parents worked hard for it. You cant stereotype and generalize a certain group of people. Unless you have met all of the wealthy people in Peru then you cant make an assumption that they are all going to be the same. I feel like this conversation was going on ten years ago and ten years from now It's still gonna be going on. It's kind of sad to think that with all of the world's problems this is what people are thinking about. Why cant people just get over it and do something productive with their time. If you don't like whats going on then do something about it...

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    1. Spoken like a true fellow who has never been to Peru.

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  85. this is true! But not all pitucos are mean, there are good and bad pitucos, but sadly there are more bad pitucos that treat you as shit if they notice you don't have so much money as they have, than good pitucos, wealthy, humble and respectful people. Good article.

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  86. Pituco is a word used by people with an inferiority complex that give into stereotypes, Obviously not something a smart person would do.

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    1. Somehow you failed to notice that you yourself used the word in your comment. What were you saying about smart people?

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  87. I went to an expensive british school in Lima and now I'm studying at possibly the most expensive university, however I never had as much money as the people in my class because of my family background. This made me spend most of my time with people who have no idea or interest in the situation of Peru's social problems.
    I completely understand the part of "wannabe pitucos" because my school was filled with them. They are people who don't really have much money but they have lots of family problems and so they try to feel better about themselves by treating others like crap. The only thing they can cling to is their idea of having more money than the rest and so they desperately use that to feel better. I was bullied at school and when I tried to defend myself saying stuff like: "I'm not fighting with a neanderthal like you who can't even look after himself", people would answer: "At least I have money".
    The problem with the maids is we're so used to this way of living, it doesn't even seem wrong anymore. Sometimes I sit with my empleada and my gardener to have lunch and they seem very uncomfortable. At my dad's house, the empleada sometimes asks me to hurry up and leave the table because she and the other workers (the gardener or the other empleada) want to have luch, as if she couldn't sit with me. It's really weird, but we're all kind of used to this way of living.
    The thing with Asia really bugs me, though. I used to go to another beach, which was public, and I would go in the sea with my empleada who was like a sibling to me (she was about 16 and I was 7). The problem is that the beaches in Asia are like clubs. If you want to buy a house there and have access to the private beach and the pools and whatever they have, you need to follow some rules. I think most of the private beaches (I don't really know how to call them, they are more like clubs or condominios) have this stupid rules that the empleadas can't swim in the sea or wear swimsuits because they are working and they should wear uniforms. The problem is people actually sign in to these stupid rules to have houses in Asia. It's disgusting.
    This is very long, I'm sorry. And sorry for the bad English.

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    1. On the contrary, your English is very good. This is one of the best comments I've ever received on this blog, thanks for your courteous, intelligent, and genuine thoughts!

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  88. D'onofrio family, Brescia family, Nicolini family, Cogornno family, Rospigliosi family are some very well known names in the high class Lima society. We know they are bankers, doctors, and business people, they are Pituco families, whose ancestors came from Italy 100 years ago and made a successful way of life creating enterprises and companies and helping to built our country. Now, they are rich, of course, they are still white, maybe, but they are not necessarily all those adjectives you used to describe pitucos, in my country. Many of the Pituco social class in Lima are descendants of European immigrants who worked hard to get what they have now. As in any other society in Latin America, your own country or any other part of the world, there are jerks who believe they own the world. Your article pointed out real things of the society in Lima, but, at the same time, you wrote false things. You can not use your limited experience with some pitucos and generalized concepts about all of them.
    If you believe only 1% of population is Pituco, I really doubt you had the chance to talk to any of them. That 1% you mentioned, might corresponds to the real wealthy rich people on my country. The children of that people not even study in Peru. They raise their kids in Europe and return to Lima for a short period of time. They are the really upper class of this country and probably they are less than 1 % of the Peruvian population. Your article probably refers to the middle class people. People who lives in Miraflores, San Borja, La Molina, San Isidro, Jesús Maria, Surco, etc. The people who live in this areas make up the 20% of the population of Lima and most of them are considered "white" and "rich" in Lima by the poor people who are, in most cases, indigenous descendants. That middle class Pituco people might have that derogatory attitude but, once again, you should not generalized concepts. Many of them worked really hard to get what they have.

    My advice: read more about the history of Pitucos in Lima. Learn more about the demographic growing and also review your Peruvian History notes.

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    1. It doesn't matter how hard you've worked in your life, you never "earn" the right to hold slaves.

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  89. This is probably the most ridiculous article I have ever read. Facts are wrong, guy is so hurt, did a "pituco" girl break your heart or something? You obviously have a more than abnormal rejection for people that have money or live a comfortable life.
    So now, the facts: Poverty in Peru has decreased from 60,7% to 25,5%
    The new middle class and consolidated middle class has increased from 30% in 1999 to 60% in 2013
    And the rich or higher class grew from 9,3% to 14,5% in 2013, so your are waaaaayyyy too wrong, Peru's economy is now the 40th economy in the world by GDP.
    As you see, for starters you are wrong.
    Second fact, the educated high class and middle class is not filled with stupid arrogant brads, actually, it is compounded by hardworking friendly peruvians that know their luck and respect. I believe I am very lucky to have been able to study in a private institution and my university studies abroad, but I clean, wash, cook and iron as everybody else, even if I had a maid in my parents house, same as the majority of my friends. So there it goes for your second fact.
    Third fact: Last night at 10pm a var driver (Taxi driver who doesn't belong to your stigmatised Pituco population hit a little girl in an avenue, instead of looking for assistance or call for help, he ran away, but he didn't notice that the girl was trapped on his wheel, so he started to drag her, but when he noticed, instead of stopping, he had the brilliant idea to pass by 2 stop bumps to get rid of her, making her not only dead but also chopped into pieces.) To make this short, statistics say that the majority of accidents in the city of Lima are by uneducated people that didn't complete High school, which belong surprisingly not to the horrible pituco people that have money and are so evil.
    Fact 4. Another study made by Apoyo (You can google what that is, I am guessing you are not only wrong but have probably never stepped foot in Peru) says that 30% of the uneducated people from our capital have enough income to study a technical or professional career, so the lack of growth of these people is not due to the slaving mechanism of the rich or semi rich. It is because there is a settling sensation in life that some people have, they just want to settle where they are (Im not saying it's everyone, its this 30%)
    5th fact. Racism in clubs was a reality in the 2000s, nowadays it is condemned, not only by law but by the entire society. Racism in general has decreased considerably, My skin for example is darker than yours probably, I have afro peruvian blood, and my girlfriend is a white peruvian that could easily be confused with a european, I don't see us been shunned socially, actually it is more common than you think.
    6th. I am very sorry for the bad experiences you may have had, but I know so many people that are wonderful and come from that part of society that you hate so much, they have been wonderful friends to me, they belong as well as I do to Doctors without borders and have travelled with me to the most hidden places in our country to bring health and love to our brothers.

    Hope you feel better with yourself someday.

    Dr. J.B.

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    1. Uh-huh...well you made up some statistics so it's impossible to argue.

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  90. Statistics are actually real.
    http://peru21.pe/noticia/17771/fue-aprobada-ley-que-castiga-racismo-discriminacion-playas-peru\
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty_in_South_America
    http://www.peruthisweek.com/news-60-of-peruvian-citizens-are-now-considered-middle-class-103215
    I'll keep you posted, for your own sake and credibility.

    Hoping for the best for you and your blog.

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    1. Wikipedia and Peru21...surely two scholarly sources beyond compare. Yeah, you've got a real fix on "credibility." I think my blog will do just fine without your "sources" and your racist stories of impoverished people slaughtering children. I've no time for idiots and I'm done with you...all further comments of yours will be deleted unread.

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